Visit our booth at the 50th International Congress on Medeval Studies in Kalamazoo. (Booth #8, Exhibit Hall, Goldsworth Valley III, Western Michigan University)

"Peace Making in the Marriage Practices of Bosnian's in Bosnia-Herzegovina."
Venue: Dayton International Peace Museum, 208 W Monument Ave Dayton, OH, 45402 United States

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Our 2015 Spring/Summer catalogue is available for download.

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Watch an interview with Margarita Balmaceda about energy and state-building in Eastern Europe and about her book "Living the High Life in Minsk".

Energy and State-Building in Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania: Between Domestic Oligarchs and Russian Power 

a lecture by

Margarita M. Balmaceda

- See more at: http://www.ceu.hu/event/2015-01-13/energy-and-state-building-ukraine-belarus-and-lithuania-between-domestic-oligarchs#sthash.51Usuh1V.dpuf

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Search the full text of our books:


 

An Empire of Others
Creating Ethnographic Knowledge in Imperial Russia and the USSR

 

Edited by Roland Cvetkovski and Alexis Hofmeister

Roland Cvetkovski is assistant professor at the Department of Eastern European History in Cologne
Alexis Hofmeister is research assistant at the Department of History, University of Basel

Ethnographers helped to perceive, to understand and also to shape imperial as well as Soviet Russia’s cultural diversity. This volume focuses on the contexts in which ethnographic knowledge was created. Usually, ethnographic findings were superseded by imperial discourse: Defining regions, connecting them with ethnic origins and conceiving national entities necessarily implied the mapping of political and historical hierarchies. But beyond these spatial conceptualizations the essays particularly address the specific conditions in which ethnographic knowledge appeared and changed. On the one hand, they turn to the several fields into which ethnographic knowledge poured and materialized, i.e., history, historiography, anthropology or ideology. On the other, they equally consider the impact of the specific formats, i.e., pictures, maps, atlases, lectures, songs, museums, and exhibitions, on academic as well as non-academic manifestations.

Contents: 1. Introduction: On the Making of Ethnographic Knowledge in Russia 2. Imperial Case Studies: Russian and British Ethnographic Theory Part I: Paradigms 3. Russian Ethnography as a Science: Truths Claimed, Trails Followed 4. Beyond, Against, and with Ethnography: Physical Anthropology as a Science of Russian Modernity 5. Ethnography, Marxism and Soviet Ideology 6. Ethnogenesis and Historiography: Historical Narratives for Central Asia, 1940s–1950s Part II: Representations 7. Symbols, Conventions and Practices: Visual Representation of Ethnographic Knowledge on Siberia in Early Modern Maps and Reports 8. Empire Complex: Arrangements in the Russian Ethnographic Museum, 1910 9. Learning about the Nation: Ethnographical Representations of Children, Representations of Ethnography for Children Part III: Peoples 10. Siberian Ruptures: Dilemmas of Ethnography in Imperial Situation 11. Concepts of Ukrainian Folklore and the Transition from Imperial Russia to Stalin’s Soviet Empire 12. No Love Affair: Ingush and Chechen Imperial Ethnographies 13. National Inventions: The Imperial Emancipation of the Karaites from Jewishness 14. List of Contributors

“The central contribution of this book is its detailed focus on the specific contexts that shaped the creation of ethnographic knowledge in modern Russia. When read together, the essays offer a revealing archeology of the discipline, showing readers how tsarist and Soviet ethnographers simultaneously defined both their subjects and their own expertise over a roughly three-hundred year period.”—Willard Sunderland, University of Cincinnati

2014
414 pages
978-615-5225-76-5 cloth $75.00 / €57.00 / £47.00

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